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Artist Alley: Craig White Illustration

January 29th, 2010 Angela Posted in Artist Alley 7 Comments »

I am very pleased to welcome artist Craig White here to DarkFaerieTales.com to talk about his book cover artwork.

You can also visit Craig around the web here: Website

Welcome Craig!

DFT: How did you get started in the illustration field?

I’ve always been into art.  My twin brother, Brian and I were always doing creative things when we were kids.  We chose art as careers in high school, and went to art school together and are both freelance illustrators.  I was an Art Director at an ad agency many years ago, but did any graphic design and illustration that I could in-house.  A friend of Brian’s was looking for illustrators to create digital illustrations (which were quite new at the time) of Marvel characters for Fleer trading cards– back in 1995 I think.  Brian put me in touch with the friend and both Brian and I did some cards.  They liked them so we did some more… then I quit my ad agency job to go full time freelance.  I think I did about 150 cards for Fleer over a few years.  I met my good friend and agent, Peter Lott through that contact.  My first client with Peter was Scholastic. I did a series of book covers called Give Yourself Goosebumps.

DFT: How did you find your style? Has it changed since you started?

My first style was based on what I knew as an airbrush artist, only done on computer.  Yes, my style has changed– almost constantly.  I actually have several different looks that I use regularly.

My current “photographic” style was born several years ago when I did some re-covers for a Laurell K. Hamilton series.  It was pretty fresh looking at the time and it just kind of evolved into what it is today.  I’m actually changing that style at the moment… always trying to stay a step ahead of myself— not an easy thing to do.

DFT: How long do you generally spend on a project?

I do almost 100% book cover work these days.  It really depends on the project, but if the planets are in alignment, a cover usually takes about a week.  Sometimes a lot less, sometimes much, much, longer.


DFT: What are some important things to keep in mind when pursuing a career as an Illustrator?

Treat your craft as a business.  When you create art for someone else, they are the ones who are in charge.  Do your best to do your best work, but remember that keeping your clients happy will bring you more work.

DFT: Do you have any advice for an artist that is interested in doing book cover work?

Get hooked up with an agent.  This business is more competitive than ever.  You’ll have a better chance at getting steady work if you have a good agent on your side.  That said, if you’re a great salesperson and have good contacts, go for it.


DFT: Are your originals for sale, owned by you or licensed?

I do all of my work on a Mac, so there aren’t any originals, per se.  I do sell prints of all of my work– please check out my web site for info, or email me.  Yes, I own all the copyrights of all of my work.

DFT: Do you accept private commissions?

Yes.  I have accepted a few.  If I have the time, I am always eager to accept private commissions.


DFT: Is any of your illustration work digital, or is it all analogue?

All digital.  I do paint with oils for personal work every once in a while…when I want to get my hands dirty. :-)

DFT: How did you get into doing work as a cover artist?

My agent works almost exclusively with publishers.


DFT: What is your process when working with clients? Can you run us through a typical job? What is your creative process?

I get an email from my agent or the client.  They usually have an idea of what they want.  For example: “Hero is a male “vampire” with dark hair, pale skin, muscular build, shirtless, holding a sword.  A cemetery with fog and spooky trees in the background.  The color scheme could be reds.”  Sometimes I’ll get a manuscript and will read it and pull out things that I think would make a cool cover.  Sometimes I’ll send sketches of what I’m thinking about, sometimes not.

I’ll send the client model choices and either shoot it here in Los Angeles or have a photographer shoot it in New York.  I’ll email the client a few selects from the shoot and work on the one they choose.  I have a library of stock images I use for backgrounds or I’ll go out and shoot backgrounds as needed.  I’ll put everything together in Photoshop and email the client a couple of “comps” for approval.  They usually make changes and we go back and forth until everyone is happy.  Then I ftp them the high resolution file… then it’s on to the next one.

DFT: Is there a cover that you wish you had done or that you just really love?

I see stuff daily that I really love.  I really like that new Hush Hush cover… very cool.  I’m also a fan of Chris McGrath (Jim Butcher books) and Cliff Nielsen’s work.

DFT: Which author would you love to do a book cover for?

Hmm.  That’s tough.  I’ve done covers for a lot of great authors.  Can I get back to you on that one?


DFT: What is the best part about what you do?

I am my own boss.  I absolutely LOVE my job.  I get to work in the most amazing field with wonderful people every day.

DFT: Do you ever have creative slumps?  What do you do then?

Absolutely.  I get stuck all the time.  I try and find inspiration from everything creative around me.  Movies, books, other artists, music.

DFT: What was one of your favorite projects?

I have many that I’m proud of.  I really like how “And Falling Fly” came out as well as the Marjorie M. Liu “Iron Hunt” series.

DFT: Describe your work setting.

My meager office/studio consists of my desk which supports my MacPro and monitor.  My wacom tablet, a couple of printers, a telephone and a day bed that my pug sleeps on (all day!).

DFT: Do you have any current projects that you would like to tell us about?

I just did the 3rd book in the Iron Hunt series– actually we’re still going back and forth with it… hopefully it will be done soon.  Also working on the follow up to “And Falling Fly”.

DFT: What is your favorite fairy tale? Why?

I’m not sure if it’s a fairy tale, but I like the King Arthur story.  I always liked it– from when I was young. I guess I just like knights. ;-)

DFT: What do you like to read for pleasure?

I used to read Stephen King– before his current “crazy” years.  I read “The Road” by Cormac Macarthy, a while back and just tried to get through Blood Meridian, but that was just not my cup of tea.  I have started to re-read Robert E. Howards Conan books again.  My sister is absolutely hooked on J.R.  Ward and was surprised to find out that I did a few of those covers.  I guess she’ll loan me her copies when she’s done.

DFT: Craig – thanks for sharing and taking the time to stop by.


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Artist Alley: Sharon Tancredi Illustration

January 22nd, 2010 Angela Posted in Artist Alley 9 Comments »

I am very pleased to welcome the amazingly talented artist Sharon Tancredi here to DarkFaerieTales.com to talk about her creative process.

You can also visit Sharon around the web here: Website

Welcome Sharon!

DFT: Are you trained as an artist?

I did a college art foundation year in London, and then went on to do a BA in Visual Communication Design at university, also in London.

DFT: How long do you generally spend on a project?

That really does depend on the project.  I’ve done children’s books, book covers, advertising, packaging and editorial illustration.  An editorial illustration can and often needs to be turned around in a day, whereas you will have three months or more to produce illustrations for a children’s book.

DFT: What are some important things to keep in mind when pursuing a career as an Illustrator?

As with any ‘creative occupation’, it’s very tough to turn it into a career.  The competition is steep and probably less than 5% of people who set out to become a full-time illustrator actually make that a reality.  You have to be quite obsessive about wanting to do it, you have to be passionate about art and illustration generally, and it’s important to look at many creative disciplines, emerge yourself in the world of art, go to exhibitions, keep up with trends and what other successful illustrators are doing, and keep your style fresh and current.  Certain illustrative styles come in and out of fashion, and you have to keep moving forward, whilst not losing what makes your style personal and memorable.  Also you have to have a thick skin and accept a few hard knocks and rejections along the way!

DFT: Do you have any advice for an artist that is interested in doing book cover work?

Look at what’s popular, what types of styles are being used at the moment.  Go to book shops and see what stands out, see what the best sellers are doing.  Make sure you approach the right publishers who are likely to commission your type of work.  But it isn’t always necessarily about fitting in to what has ‘already been done’ – some publishers like to take risks and do something different.  Become familiar with these types of publishers and approach them – but approach them with a bit of knowledge about their titles and where you think your style might fit in with that.  And, as with any type of illustration, it’s all about getting seen, so self-promotion is important, getting your work on illustration web sites, getting in awards annuals, and ideally getting an agent who can help you get seen by potential commissioners.

DFT: Are your originals for sale, owned by you or licenced?

As I work digitally there is really no such thing as “an original”, however I do limited edition prints which are available for purchase on my website.  There is just a selection available at present, but I can do one-offs of other existing work that doesn’t have a current print-run.  All my work is owned and licensed by me.  When I produce an illustration for a commission I license that artwork to the commissioner, but retain copyright ownership myself.

DFT: Do you accept private commissions?

Yes, and I have done a few private commissions.

DFT: Is any of your illustration work digital, or is it all analogue?

It is all digital.  I did start out as a painter, but found that digital work is much more practical for commercial work.  However it wasn’t just a practical decision, I do enjoy producing digital illustration and it is a wonderful medium in and of itself!

DFT: How did you get into doing work as a cover artist?

I think my style lends itself well to book covers, in that it is very decorative with lots of design embellishment.  I never sought out to do work for book covers as such – I just do what I do, get seen as much as I can, and then hope what I’m doing attracts commissions!  I do particularly enjoy book covers though as there is rarely a defined ‘brief’ as such.  You are very much left to your own devices in coming up with your own visual interpretation of a story.

DFT: What process do you use to create a cover? Do you read the book?

It’s definitely important to read the book.  You need to get the mood of the story across visually, as well as fleshing out the characters, if the cover requires illustrating one or more characters from the story.  And the only way those images can take shape in your mind is to read the story and allow those characters to come to life.  In the first instance I supply pencil drawings to the publisher, and after a bit of to-ing and fro-ing, ironing out the details, getting the composition right so that it works with the text, you then go to final artwork.  Sometimes there is a bit of tweaking post-final artwork, but hopefully most of these details are agreed and finalized at rough stage.  The most important thing is conveying a mood, and coming up with something visually arresting that is going to stand out on the shelves and catch people’s eyes!

DFT: Which author would you love to do a book cover for?

At the moment I’m just excited at the prospect of doing more covers for Nicole Peeler’s Jane True series!  Jane is a fantastic and exciting character – she’s intelligent, witty, sexy, vulnerable and heroic, so there is so much scope to place her in loads of different scenarios and gradually build on what’s already been done.  Hopefully with each adventure and new cover her character will continue to evolve and reveal itself further.  She is definitely not just a pretty face!

DFT: Do you think book covers can have a positive/negative impact on the sales of a book?

I suppose at the end of the day it’s all subjective – what some people love, others will be really turned off by.  I think Orbit was really brave to take a new direction with Nicole’s books, and do something that hadn’t really been done yet with urban fantasy novels.  And also brave to go with something that, in the first instance, did receive some knee-jerk negative responses.  It’s easy to go with the flow, just re-hash what’s already been done and therefore proven ‘safe’ within an established genre.  But sometimes you have to take a few risks if you want to try and possibly appeal to new readers who perhaps up until that point haven’t explored urban fantasy literature.  Whenever you do something ‘different’ you’re bound to get a bit of flak at first, as a lot of people just want ‘more of the same thing’, more of what they’re used to.  But it takes a clever and forward-thinking art director to sit through all the initial hyperbole and keep the faith in the risks they decided to take with commissioning something that was a bit ‘different’.

DFT: Do you feel that a cover should accurately reflect the characters inside the book?

Again, an accurate refection of a character is a completely subjective thing.  I suppose if there was no illustration of Jane on the covers of Tempest Rising or Tracking the Tempest, it would be left up to each reader to create their own visual interpretation in their mind of Jane.  And most likely if you asked each and every reader to draw a picture of Jane after they’d read the book, each would come up with something quite different.  But I do think it is important that the character that you create succeeds at embodying that character as ‘honestly’ as possible.  You have to capture that character in some real way, that is consistent with the personality that comes across in the writing.  You have to see some sort of personality in that face, which can be achieved with very subtle things – eyes, expression, etc.  Ideally that character has to appear, at the very least, ‘interesting’.  Hopefully their look will captivate you in some way, and make you want to know their story.  When I read Tempest Rising, I saw “Jane” very clearly, immediately.  And I think that only an extremely talented writer can succeed at fleshing out a character so instantly in your mind.  I’m sure we’ve all read books in the past where the character remains vague and nondescript to us visually throughout, because the writing just simply isn’t as strong as it could be.

DFT: Do you have any upcoming book covers being released?

I have nothing in the pipelines at the moment book-cover wise outside of the Jane True series.  I’m doing a lot of editorial illustration right now, and some children’s book stuff.  With self-employed illustration things change from day to day, and I don’t even know what I’m going to be working on next month at this moment!  That’s one of the exciting aspects of what I do.

DFT: Do you have any current projects that you would like to tell us about?

(See above.)  There is nothing I’m currently working on that I wish to “shout about” as such.  I shall probably be receiving the manuscript for the third Jane True book soon, so can’t wait to get started on it.

DFT: What is your favorite fairy tale? Why?

I remember in the early 60’s there was this stop-frame animated film based on “Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer”.  I was utterly captivated by this as a child and still watch the DVD every Christmas.  I was so moved by the plight of the rejected toys on the Island of Misfit Toys.  The ‘train with square wheels’ and the ‘boat that couldn’t stay afloat’, amongst others…  I thought it was just a beautiful paradigm on the idea that everyone deserves to be loved despite their ‘handicaps and abnormalities’, and that being different is something to be celebrated rather than ridiculed and rejected, which is really the message of the entire story.  The most humane lesson that we could ever hope to pass on to our children!

DFT: What do you like to read for pleasure?

All sorts!  I read a lot of social history stuff.  I’ve always been particularly interested in anything that documents the personal and day-to-day lives of ordinary people in previous centuries.  I sometimes like reading the ‘dark’ side of social history, and am currently reading a book all about crime and vice in 18th and 19th Century Britain (I am American but have been living in the UK for 25 years).  I had never read urban fantasy until I read Nicole’s books, and can’t wait to read more!  I love the idea of mixing contemporary characters and settings with other worldly fantasy.  I read novels – there’s a British writer called Ian McEwan who is a favorite of mine.  And I read lots of books and magazines on art and illustration.

DFT: Sharon – thanks so much for taking the time to stop by.

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Artist Alley: Tony Mauro Illustration

December 21st, 2009 Angela Posted in Artist Alley 6 Comments »

I’m so excited to welcome the amazingly talented cover artist Tony Mauro here to DarkFaerieTales.com to talk about his work.  Tony is the mastermind behind the brilliant artwork for Yasmine Galenorn, Anya Bast, Jory Strong to name a few.

You can visit Tony around the web here: Website | Myspace

Yasmine

Welcome Tony!

DFT: How did you get started in the illustration field?

After graduating from the Art Institute of Pittsburgh in 1991 my first job was for a small illustration studio in Buffalo. They specialized in graphics for pro sports apparel.  We did airbrush illustrations for all of the pro teams for baseball, football, basketball and hockey.  It was a great place to really refine my skills.  I worked there for 3 years and probably did over 100 illustrations in that time.

Jory

DFT: How did you find your style? Has it changed since you started?

I think I really started developing my style after about 8 years in the field.  It can take quite a while to really start to see yourself come through in your work.  I think in the beginning you’re still looking at a lot of other people’s work and trying to mimic what has already been proven to be successful.  You also have clients asking for a certain look or style. As you mature in your career your clients will start calling and asking you to do your style.

You’re always growing as an artist so I think it’s natural for your style to grow and change over time as well.  I think if you look at my early airbrush work and compare it to my digital work now it’s still obvious that it was done by the same person but is very different at the same time.

Virginia

DFT: How long do you generally spend on a project?

This is kind of a tricky question to answer because there is a lot of time that goes into a piece even before you get to the drawing board (so to speak).  I’m usually given about 3 to 4 weeks for a book cover commission.  I’ll spend the first week or two finding a model, props, outfits and anything else that might be needed for the photo shoot.  Once the shoot is done and I have gone through all of the shots and selected which ones I will use.  I usually spend about a week on the computer building a few different options for my client to choose from.

DFT: What are some important things to keep in mind when pursuing a career as an Illustrator?

I guess I’d have to say stay focused on what you really want to do.  There are so many different ways to make a living as an illustrator so it’s important to decide what area you want to work in and really go after that.  It pays to be specialized.  Don’t get me wrong, it is important to be versatile but clients are much more comfortable when they hire someone who specializes in what they need.

Victorian

DFT: Do you have any advice for an artist that is interested in doing book cover work?

Go to the book stores as often as you can and look around at what’s popular and what the trends are.  Inside every book is the name of the cover artist and usually the art director that hired him.  That’s a great way to get contact names at the publishing houses.  There is also a book called the Illustrator’s and Designer’s Market.  It’s an annual book and is filled with client contact info for ALL aspects of the industry.  It’s a must for any freelancer.

DFT: Are your originals for sale, owned by you or licensed?

Now that I’m all digital, unfortunately there is no “original” anymore.  I own the art when it’s for a book cover and I license it to the publisher for use in their own market.  If Germany, France, Latin America etc… want to use the art for their edition of the same book they each have to pay the artist a separate licensing fee.

Chloe

DFT: Do you accept private commissions?

Private commissions are really tough.  My commercial work and my fantasy work keep so unbelievably busy that it’s a very rare case that I’d take on any private commissions.

DFT: Is any of your illustration work digital, or is it all analogues?

I was a traditional airbrush illustrator for about 8 years before going totally digital in 1998.  Now all of my work is done in Photoshop.  I still paint the exact same way as I always did only without the mess.

Guns

DFT: How did you get into doing work as a cover artist?

An art director at Penguin Publishing saw my fantasy work in one of the Spectrum books (Spectrum is an annual worldwide illustration competition where illustrators from all over submit their work to be judged.  They put out a book every year featuring all of the winners.) and called me to work on a new series she was assigned.  The rest is history, the series went over great and Penguin has since become my biggest client.  That was about 3 years ago and I’ve done over 70 covers for them since then.

Red

DFT: What is your process when working with clients? Can you run us through a typical job? What is your creative process?

I’m usually given either a manuscript or a synopsis to read at the beginning to get familiar with the story and characters.  From there it depends on the art director.   Sometimes I’m given a detailed description of what they would like to see for the cover and sometimes they say go ahead and work up some concepts and we go from there.   Either way is fine with me.  I love to conceptualize but it’s also really nice when you have a client that is very clear and concise about what they want.  From there I start casting a model to be featured on the cover (if it’s applicable).  Like I mentioned earlier, I’ll start getting the outfits and any props necessary together for the shoot.   After the shoot I go through all the shots and make my selects.  That’s when I actually sit down at the computer and start building my designs.  I usually give them 3 or 4 versions to choose from.

Chains

DFT: Is there a cover that you wish you had done or that you just really love?

I really like all of the Twilight covers.  Not because of the success of the series but because I love simple, bold and iconic images.  I’m also a big fan of small tasteful type layouts or as I like to call it “tasty type”.

DFT: Which author would you love to do a book cover for?

I just finished working on the trade paperback version of Stephen King’s new novel Under the Dome.  The hardcover just came out so they won’t release my paperback version for a while but that was really exciting to work on.  My favorite author is James Patterson though, so I’d be thrilled to work on one of his books.

Anya

DFT: What is the best part about what you do?

I can honestly say I love the whole process from beginning to end.  The shoots are a little stressful for me because I never considered myself a photographer.  In my case the photos are just a means to an end.  All of my work comes in when I sit down at the computer and start cutting apart the shots and making something out of them.  You’ve heard me use the term “building” a few times already.  It truly is a building process when designing these covers.  Any one cover of mine that you look at is usually made up of anywhere from 5 to 10 photos that have been cut, stretched and distorted like crazy.  If you see trees in any of my backgrounds it very likely that each tree was on a separate layer and was strategically placed by me to move your eye around the image or to simply stop your eye from going right off of the page.  You’d be surprised at how much thought goes into every element that you introduce into an image. Everything has to have a purpose or it doesn’t belong.

Hulk

DFT: Do you ever have creative slumps?  What do you do then?

Oh yeah, I usually call it a creative rut.  I think it comes on by being over worked.  All artist have to be careful not burn themselves out.  If you work too much you really run the risk of losing your edge because you simply don’t have the time to do it right.  The cure is a break!  Even if it’s only a long weekend.  Sometimes you just need to step away from it all and let your mind recharge.

Narnia

DFT: What was one of your favorite projects?

The Stephen King project was definitely the most exciting because he is such a high profile author.  That image will most likely be picked up in every market around the world so that’s pretty exciting.

DFT: Describe your work setting.

In a word DARK.  LOL…my office is like a cave.  I have black out windows so it’s always dark in there.  I love my office though, I’m surrounded by swords and prop guns and all kinds of funky items that have been used in past illustrations. The house of an illustrator is usually a pretty interesting place because of all of the props we acquire over the years. Just yesterday I ordered a medieval wooden crossbow for a new project I just got in.  After the projects over that crossbow will probably find a place on my wall in my office until there’s a call for it again.

DFT: Do you have any current projects that you would like to tell us about?

Well I’m really happy about my new 2010 calendar being out.  Just in time for the holidays (wink, wink, nudge, nudge) they’re available in the store section of my website at www.darkdayproductions.com

Pirates

DFT: What is your favorite fairy tale? Why?

The Poor Man and the Rich Man.

http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~spok/grimmtmp/172.txt

This fairy tale seems scarily relevant to the state of our country and our society these days.

DFT: What do you like to read for pleasure?

I love suspense thrillers.  Like I said before James Patterson’s Alex Cross books are my absolute favorite to read.

DFT: Many thanks, Tony for stopping by Dark Faerie Tales.

sig-DFT

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Artist Alley: Chris McGrath Illustration

December 16th, 2009 Angela Posted in Artist Alley 7 Comments »

I am very pleased to present to you Chris McGrath, the wonderfully talented cover artist behind the huge bestsellers such as: The Dresden Files (Jim Butcher), Sign of the Zodiac Series (Vicki Pettersson), and many more.

WhiteNight

You can visit Chris around the web here: Website

DFT: Are you trained as an artist?

Yes.  I was trained classically at The School of Visual Arts in NYC.  At the time Photoshop was not around so I learned to draw and paint with traditional media such as oils.

DFT: How long do you generally spend on a project?

That really depends.  The sketch phase can be the longest sometimes.  Science fiction covers generally take a bit longer than the urban fantasy one because there is usually more detail involved.

DFT: How did you find your style?  Has it changed since you started?

I think my style has changed a bit since I started.  I wasn’t looking for a style when I found it.  That’s something that just comes to you when you are painting or drawing the things that are important to you and the things that you like. Be true to yourself and your “style” will find you.

concept for solace 1

DFT: What are some important things to keep in mind when pursuing a career as an Illustrator?

Don’t give up so fast!  It takes a lot of time for most people.  Also, remain consistent. Don’t jump around with your subject matter too much or people won’t really know what you are after.  Direction is very important.  Have a clear idea of what kind of illustrator you want to be and focus your portfolio on whatever genre it is that you like.

DFT: Are your originals for sale, owned by you or licensed?

I have prints for sale on my site and the few oil paintings I have on there, I may consider selling one day.  I own all the rights to my covers.

Death Wish

DFT: Do you accept private commissions?

Not really.  I have a full schedule usually so it would be difficult.  But for the right price I could make an exception!

DFT: Is any of your illustration work digital, or is it all analogues?

Most of it these days is Photoshop.

Midwinter_web

DFT: How did you get into doing work as a cover artist?

I went into college with a clear idea of what I wanted to do and stuck with it.  When I graduated it took a few years for me to get my act together but I was always determined to be a cover artist and just kept dropping off my portfolio until I got a job.  Then from there it was a few years before it was really a full time job.

DFT: What process do you use to create a cover? Do you read the book?

Sometimes I get to read the book but pretty often the book company already has some ideas as to what they want on the cover.  From there the sketch phase begins and sometimes I can nail a good idea right away but most of the time it is a struggle to come up with ideas.  Especially when you’ve been doing covers for 9 years it becomes harder and harder to come up with different concepts.

Underground

DFT: Describe your work setting.

I had a friend over last week and she said my desk looks like landfill.  It’s pretty messy.  Lots of notes and paper and audio equipment etc…I basically have a 20inch apple display and a quad core Mac with a Wacom tablet.

DFT: Do you ever have creative slumps? What do you do then?

I have them all the time.  I haven’t figured out a good solution yet.  I just keep sketching, watching movies and so on, hoping something will come to me.  Sometimes the project itself is different enough that it will work itself out.

Trick of Light

DFT: Is there a cover that you wish you had done or that you just really love?

There are so many.  More recently, maybe Craig Mullins “When Gravity Fails”.  I really like Eric Fortune’s stuff too.

DFT: What was one of your favorite projects?

I really enjoyed doing “Midwinter” and the “Mistborn” series.  Also, the Clone Republic series is a lot of fun.

DFT: Which author would you love to do a book cover for?

Michael Moorcock, Frank Herbert or Dan Simmons.

Rosemary

DFT: Are there any of your covers that you ended up not liking?

Tons!  For every ten covers I may be ok with 3.

Modo

DFT: Do you feel that a cover should accurately reflect the characters inside the book?

Sometimes that’s hard.  Especially when the book is not finished.  As long as it catches the mood and vibe of the book, I think it’s ok.

DFT: Do you have any current projects that you would like to tell us about?

There are a few I’m looking forward to starting soon.  Wicked City 2, Vampire Empire, and the third book for Joe Abercrombie’s series to name a few.

DFT: What is your favorite fairy tale? Why?

I’m not sure.  Does the Elric series count?  If so, that would be the one.

DFT: What do you like to read for pleasure?

I read mostly science fiction and modern fantasy.  I really love Haruki Murakami, Jeffrey Ford, Dan Simmons and writers like that.  I do have to say, video games have taken up some of that space, though.

DFT: Many thanks, Chris.  I appreciate you taking the time to do the interview.

sig-DFT

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