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I Belong


Guest Author: Kalayna Price (Guest Post & Giveaway)

My guest today is urban fantasy author Kalayna Price.  The first book in her new Alex Craft series, Grave Witch,  hits bookshelves on October 5, 2010.  Please join me in welcoming Kalayna here today to Dark Faerie Tales. You can read the first chapter of the book here.

One lucky commenter will have a chance to win a $10 Amazon gift certificate.  As always, details are listed at the end of the post.

Welcome Kalayna!

Folklore in Fiction

by Kalayna Price

Thanks for having me here today, Angela. Since this is Dark Faerie Tales, I thought this would be a great place to talk about folklore and, well, faerie tales.

Throughout history and across cultures, certain motifs have emerged in local legend time and again. Almost every culture has a story of creatures returning from the dead, of those who plague the living in search of blood, or of a creature with the power to change its shape. What is it about monsters that fascinates the human imagination? Featuring gods or demons, stories have been told from the beginning of time to explain the unexplainable in the world around us. And those stories are often excellent fodder for modern fiction.

For my new urban fantasy series, the Alex Craft novels, I decided to focus on folklore involving the Fae or Faeries, as we might call them, but they have been known by many names (and many natures). In Ireland they were called the Tuatha de Danann and were great masters of magic who lived under grassy hills. The Tylwyth Teg were Welsh faeries who were often found dancing in fairy rings and tricked mortals to dance with them (to no good end for the mortals). Sidh or Sith were Gaelic names for faeries in the Highlands of Scotland. Bean Sidh (pronounced Banshee) is often used to refer to a particular type of faerie in modern times but actually means “faerie woman” in Gaelic. In various countries and times, Faeries have called the “wee folk,” the “good neighbors,” and the “fair folk” (among other names).

Faeries were said to both bestow great blessings and to cause tremendous disasters. They were labeled as tricksters who led travelers astray or as guardians who watched over a household. If milk curdled or a calf sickened, it was said a faerie stole away its essence. A child who died suddenly was thought to have been taken by the faeries, and what the family buried was only some bit of ‘stock’ left by the faeries and disguised to look like the child. They were blamed for everything from sickness to bad fortune, but not all tales include malicious faeries. There are stories of faeries favoring mortals and supplying an endless bag of seed for the kindness of a song or blessing a man’s holdings so that he prospered greatly. Of course, most of these gifts came with the taboo that the source of the sudden wealth never be revealed or all that was gained would be lost.

When I first started plotting GRAVE WITCH, one of the early ideas I worked with was “What if the fae of folklore were real and they very publically revealed their existence to the world?” Of course, there is too much folklore—and far too many contradictions in folklore—for it all to be true, but it could be inspired by actions of individual faeries. The trick then, was to translate ideas from these stories into modern times.

It’s been a lot of fun writing in the world Alex inhabits because the fae’s revelation brought on a magical awakening that changed everyday life for mortals. In Alex’s world, the fae are real, magic is accessible, and other, wilder legends might just be waking, and yet the world is still recognizable. You may pass a troll on your way to work and keep your coffee warm with an enchanted mug, but paying the rent and a car one bad crank away from the junkyard are still everyday worries. It was interesting to mix bits of magic from folklore into modern day life, and I hope readers enjoy the world and the story.

Author Bio:

Kalayna Price is the author of the Alex Craft Novels, a new dark urban fantasy series from Roc, and the author of the Novels of Haven from Bell Bridge Books. She draws her ideas from the world around her, her studies into ancient mythologies, and her obsession with classic folklore. Her stories contain not only the mystical elements of fantasy, but also a dash of romance, a bit of gritty horror, some humor, and a large serving of mystery. She is a member of SFWA and RWA, and an avid hula-hoop dancer who has been known light her hoop on fire.

You can visit Kalayna around the web here: Website | Blog | Twitter | Facebook

GIVEAWAY GUIDELINES:

One lucky commenter will have a chance to win a $10 Amazon gift certificate.

To enter, leave a comment below answering the following question:

What is your favorite bit of folklore/legend/or myth and what do you think it explain or warned against?

1. +1 entry for answering the question (required).

2. +2 entries for becoming a follower of this blog and Dark Faerie Tales on Twitter.

3. +3 entries for tweeting about this contest, blogging about it, linking via your sidebar etc…(please tell me where!).

4. Giveaway is open to U.S. and Canada residents only.

5. Please include your email address in your comment.

6. Giveaway ends Monday, October 18th at 11:59 PM EST.

7. The winner will be picked with the help of Random.org.


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41 Responses to “Guest Author: Kalayna Price (Guest Post & Giveaway)

  1. Kelly/YllektraNo Gravatar
    1

    Oh, I have read some of Kalayna’s interviews! Thanks for hosting this!
    I didn’t know that about the legends of Fae and that they had other names by other peoples.

    I think it is very refreshing to have some magic incorporated into the world and being normal on other respects!
    I’m sure it is going to be a book i will love to read!

    Thanks!

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  2. StephNo Gravatar
    2

    I come from a northern Italian/Greco-Turk family and life was filled with superstition. My father would never hand a knife or scissor or any cutting tool to anyone. He would have made a pretty bad surgical nurse, I guess. The reason was that it would cut a friendship. I think it has to do with being careful of the feelings and needs of friends and others. Human relationships are fragile and can be ruined with a sharp word or careless remark.
    A funnier piece of lore, oddly common to where I grew up upstate ny was that of expecting company if you dropped cutlery, tea/table spoon young/older woman, knife boy or man and fork was a whole family. “Sporks”had not yet been invented. I have no idea what this is about unless if your house is messy b/c you’re dropping cutlery guests will drop by Or poss. that when cutlery was a sign of wealth, you would attract the attention of someone looking to take yours.

    Please enter me in the contest. Thanks to Drk Faerie Tales & !
    moc.tsudyriafdnasdnawsgnafnull@hpets
    @fangswandsfairy

    Old follower, Twitter peep pretty sure

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  3. KatieNo Gravatar
    3

    Growing up a always loved the Headless Horseman. It was a great scary story. You’ve got me on the meaning, but it was good fun!

    Thanks for the interview!
    Katie
    bigferret at email dot com

    +3 – Comment, old follower (bigferret), twitter (thebigferret)

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  4. debpNo Gravatar
    4

    I had often heard, that if a bird flies into your house, someone you know will die. I would write it off, but it has happened to me three times now. I would love to read this book.
    moc.oohaynull@21dnikafoowt

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  5. AmburNo Gravatar
    5

    +1 for question’s answer :)

    I’m a big fan of myths in general, but my favourite myth is probably the one surrounding Achilles’ heel. How he was shot in the heel and it was the only place he was vulnerable, so he died. I think it warns us that we all have weaknesses, we aren’t invincible, and I guess back in the time of the Greeks, it probably reminded them that they weren’t gods or immortal.

    +2 I’m a GFC (.Ambur.) and Twitter Follower (@AmburHostyn)

    Thanks for the chance to win! :D
    Ambur
    ambiepie_6(at)hotmail(dot)com

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  6. lulilutNo Gravatar
    6

    +1 I always thought the Sasquatch legend was interesting. They are also called by different names – Bigfoot, Skunk Ape, Abominable Snowman, Yeti, Yowie, Mapinguari, and Gigantopithecus.
    I think people want them to exist so the stories are told, and hoaxes are created.
    +2 Follower
    +3 http://twitter.com/lulilut/status/26391847508

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  7. TinaNo Gravatar
    7

    I think my favorite myth is probably the myth of Psyche and Eros. The moral is the importance of trust, which is kind of ironic because I’m nothing if not suspicious. Maybe that’s why it’s my favorite: I feel I still have the potential to learn from it.

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  8. Stephanie McCarthyNo Gravatar
    8

    I like the Headless Horseman. I also like the Fae and anything vampire or werewolves.
    I am a GFC follower.
    Thanks for the giveaway.

    smccar1 at hotmail dot com

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  9. Robin KNo Gravatar
    9

    That’s a very hard question. The image of the man permanently pushing the rock up a hill only to have it fall again comes to mind. As far as meaning, perhaps try try again or if at first you do not succeed and you keep trying you are an idiot (do not tell children that though :)).

    +1 entry for answering the question
    +2 follower of this blog and Twitter
    +3 http://twitter.com/#!/IntenseWhisper/statuses/26401580792

    robin [at] intensewhisper [dot] com

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  10. EdnaNo Gravatar
    10

    +1 This is probably the 5-year-old in me but I like Beauty and the Beast with the idea of loving someone for who they are not what they look like.

    +2 a follower of this blog and on Twitter (@ineedsafe).

    What is it about monsters that fascinates the human imagination?
    Good question. It’s a good escapism from reality and a fantastic way to keep your imagination on its toes. Not to mention the infinite possibilities a story can go.

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  11. Barbara ElnessNo Gravatar
    11

    My favorite legend is the Leprechauns and the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. I always thought it would be wonderful to find that pot of gold. I think it warns us not to wish for easy money, because there are always strings attached.

    Barbed1951(at)aol(dot)com

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  12. Jennelle SNo Gravatar
    12

    There are so many myths and legends that I love, but I’ll go with the first one that came to mind and that is “Pandora’s box.” What better message can we have that while there is evil in the world we still hold hope in our hands?

    jlynettes at hotmail dot com

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  13. Pam SNo Gravatar
    13

    Great interview, I’ve seen this around the web and excited about the release.
    I’ve always been intrigued by Hades and Persehpone – any of the greek mythology and also asian mythology.Not really sure on any of the meanings behind them.

    gfc and twitter follower – pams00

    tweeted –
    http://twitter.com/#!/pams00/status/26420506927

    Pam S
    pams00 @ aol.com

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  14. Jessica S.No Gravatar
    14

    +1 Ooh tough one. Uhh…I absolutely love the Grimm fairy tales and those have a slew of warnings and things they tell you not to do. But people do them anyway and still manage to overcome them.

    I also like Greek mythology, and those have a lot of different lessons as well. Creation myths and other meanings that I just can’t think of this early!

    +2 GFC Follower

    +3 Button in sidebar

    jessbess2505[at]yahoo[dot]com

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  15. kalaynaNo Gravatar
    15

    Thanks everyone who has commented thus far. You’re sharing some great stories. Keep them coming!

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  16. Rabid FoxNo Gravatar
    16

    What is your favorite bit of folklore/legend/or myth and what do you think it explain or warned against?

    +1 – I’m a sucker for a good ghost story, and if I had to be more specific I’d go with the residual hauntings from traumatic events. Though, that’s not exactly tagged to any one legend. Perhaps a better answer–and an easier one–would be werewolves. The whole shapeshiting thing, coupled with an abandonment of restraint, is an intriguing one.

    +2 – I’m a follower on GFC as well as on Twitter (@wagthefox)

    +3 – I retweeted a link to the contest. http://twitter.com/#!/WagTheFox/status/26479920785

    +3 – I’m also placing a link to the contest in the sidebar of my blog (http://waggingthefox.blogspot.com/)

    e-mail: therabidfox[at]gmail.com

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  17. kisah j.No Gravatar
    17

    one of my favorites is from ancient egypt, how osiris became the ruler of the dead….not really sure what it warns against, but it’s a neat story!

    +1 for answering the question
    +2 follower of this blog via gfc

    k_sunshine1977 at yahoo dot com

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  18. HeatherMNo Gravatar
    18

    This book sounds excellent, and I love the cover! I’d love to enter. I have so many pieces of favorite folklore that it’s hard to pick. I’ve got to go with witches though because they are so ingrained in American culture and history. I’m a follower of both your blog & on Twitter and I’ll be tweeting about this! If I’m lucky enough to win you can DM me on Twitter @HeatherMcCorkle

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  19. HeatherNo Gravatar
    19

    The Banshee, and it warned against the death of a loved one, and, in my opinion, was a way to keep people inside during bad weather XD

    moc.oohaynull@seirraebelttil
    @littlebearries on twitter

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  20. JenMNo Gravatar
    20

    I’ve always found it fascinating that most cultures around the world have some version of the great flood in their folklore. It seems to me that it must have been a real event, otherwise, why would so many diverse cultures from all around the world have a similar legend?

    +2 follower
    jen at delux dot com

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  21. Kailia SageNo Gravatar
    21

    +1 I’ve loved Achilles’ Heel and the Headless Horseman…lately, we’ve been talking about Pandora’s Box!

    +2 follower of blog and on twitter

    twilightforever.edward at gmail dot com

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  22. Jolene AllcockNo Gravatar
    22

    +1 I’ve always been fascinated by Greek Mythology and the undercurrents of lessons learned. I love the stories and there are always things to take away and learn from

    +2 GFC and twitter follower

    ten.ttanull@111enuj

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  23. AmyNo Gravatar
    23

    +1 I like the Pandora’s Box story. I believe it is warning us that some things are better left untold/unexplored because once something is “opened”, disastrous results can happen.

    angeldream3(at)gmail(dot)com

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  24. PamkNo Gravatar
    24

    our was the guy with a hook would get if you went parking with a guy in a deserted place and I guess that was to keep us from getting into trouble.
    +1 for answering
    +2 for following your blog and on twitter
    +3 for tweeting
    https://twitter.com/Pamk258/status/27201225518
    scrtsbpal at yahoo dot com

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  25. LainaNo Gravatar
    25

    moc.liamgnull@2131aniaL

    +1 I really love it all… I guess I just like the idea of there being things that we can’t explain, you know?
    +2 Follower on both
    +3 Blogged here: http://bookcontestlinks.blogspot.com/2010/10/october-12th-2010.html

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  26. AmandaNo Gravatar
    26

    My favorite myth is Pandora’s Box, because it warns to not be too curious about things.

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  27. AmandaNo Gravatar
    27

    I’m a follower and follow on twitter @amandawk

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  28. WenjNo Gravatar
    28

    +1 I think my favorite myth is about sneezing three times in a row. I’ve heard it in several different contexts, but mainly the jist behind it is that is you sneeze three times in a row and no one tells you bless you that your soul is exposed and the devil or demons can claim it. Basically I think its one of those bed time stories to make children mind their manners and tell people Bless you, but it’s still amusing even if it is silly. Almost like throwing salt over your shoulder. Quaint.

    +2 GFC and GR Follower

    blacklagoon.blown-back(at)hotmail(dot)com

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  29. AmandaNo Gravatar
    29

    Tweeted http://twitter.com/amandawk/status/27300218330

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  30. Andrea INo Gravatar
    30

    +3 Tweeted http://twitter.com/lillieblue613/status/27492820572

    moc.liamgnull@regnifni.aerdna

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  31. Andrea INo Gravatar
    31

    +2 GFC follower
    +2 Twitter follower

    The Legend of Sleepy Hollow , I think it warns against being out late at night.

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  32. Meredith MillerNo Gravatar
    32

    I like the legends of the Bigfoot…always encouraged me to stay in late at night as a young kid and not go looking for big fuzzy men. lol!

    meredithfl at gmail dot com
    +1 entry for answering the question (required).
    +2 entries for becoming a follower — GFC follower

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  33. Cori WestphalNo Gravatar
    33

    I’d have to say the myth about breaking a mirror and having 7 years bad luck. When I was about 10, I broke the mirror that fit on the back of my moms dresser. Big. It was big. And she told me that I’d have 7 years bad luck. I was so scared! Sill as it was, I was uber careful with mirrors from then on!

    coriwestphal at msn dot com

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  34. Cori WestphalNo Gravatar
    34

    I’m a Google Friend (follower): Cori Westphal

    And I follow on Twitter @coriwestphal

    Entry 1

    coriwestphal at msn dot com

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  35. Cori WestphalNo Gravatar
    35

    I’m a Google Friend (follower): Cori Westphal

    And I follow on Twitter @coriwestphal

    Entry 2

    coriwestphal at msn dot com

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  36. Cori WestphalNo Gravatar
    36

    Tweet: http://twitter.com/coriwestphal/statuses/27679076370
    Entry 1

    coriwestphal at msn dot com

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  37. Cori WestphalNo Gravatar
    37

    Tweet: http://twitter.com/coriwestphal/statuses/27679076370
    Entry 2

    coriwestphal at msn dot com

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  38. Cori WestphalNo Gravatar
    38

    Tweet: http://twitter.com/coriwestphal/statuses/27679076370
    Entry 3

    coriwestphal at msn dot com

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  39. Donna SNo Gravatar
    39

    Really I have read so many, but I think Little Red Riding Hood is a great one for teaching a lesson. You never know what is hiding behind that mask you see on the outside so always keep your guard up until you know someone.

    Blog and twitter follower

    tweet – http://twitter.com/#!/DonnaS1/statuses/27698290887

    bacchus76 at myself dot com

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  40. HeatherNo Gravatar
    40

    I’ve always thought Hansel and Gretel was amusing. Lessons against greed, bad behavior, not trusting someone based on looks…
    moc.oohaynull@seirraebelttil
    Blog and twitter follower
    (you_were_almost_right and @littlebearries)

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  41. Marlene BreakfieldNo Gravatar
    41

    Breaking a mirror is seven years of bad luck is the superstition, that I see most often quoted. I wonder where that one came from.
    +1 comment
    +2 GFC follower.
    marlenebreakfield(at)yahoo(dot)com

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