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I Belong


Review: Dust City by Robert Paul Weston

Title: Dust City

Author: Robert Paul Weston

GenreYA Fantasy

Series: N/A

Publication Date: September 30, 2010

FormatHardcover, 299 Pages

ISBN-10: 1595142967 (Razorbill/Penguin)

ISBN-13: 978-1595142962 (Razorbill/Penguin)

Reviewed by: Bridget

Synopsis:

When your dad is the wolf who killed Little Red Riding Hood, life is no fairy tale.

Henry Whelp is a Big Bad Wolf. Or will be, someday. His dad is doing time for the double murder of Little Red Riding Hood and her grandmother so everyone assumes crime is in Henry’s blood. For years, he’s kept a low profile in a Home for Wayward Wolves on the outskirts of Dust City–a gritty metropolis known for its black market, mind-altering dust. And the entire population of foxes, ravens, and hominids are hooked. But it’s not just any dust the creatures of this grim underground are slinging and sniffing. It’s fairydust.

When a murder at the Home forces Henry to escape, he begins to suspect his dad may have been framed. With a daring she wolf named Fiona by his side, Henry travels into the dark alleyways and cavernous tunnels of Dust City. There, he’ll come face to snout with legendary mobster Skinner and his Water Nixie henchmen to discover what really happened to his father in the woods that infamous night…and the shocking truth about fairydust.

Quick & Dirty: Very fun book full of some wonderful fairy tale creatures with a twist to their stories.  There was good action, a great adventure and a mystery to solve.

Opening Sentence: Once upon a time, fairydust came from where you’d expect.

Excerpt: Yes

The Review

Enter into the world of Dust City where Snow White is a daring detective, Rumpelstiltskin is the formidable villain, Jack in the Beanstalk is your best friend, and the hero is the son of The Big Bad Wolf.  A world where fairies use to spread their magic and bless all those in the land.  But years ago the fairies mysteriously disappeared.  Now there is a special dust made from the magic left behind by the fairies.  It has special healing powers, but it is also addictive and at times dangerous.  The dust is in high demand and the more pure it is the more expensive it is.

Henry Whelp is living in a home for wayward boys and creatures.  His mother died when he was very young and his father is in prison for the murder of Little Red Riding Hood and her Grandmother.  Henry has always been a mellower wolf and has tried to stay out of trouble, but then his psychiatrist gets murdered.  Then he gets a bunch of letters from his father and something doesn’t seem right.  It is time to find out what really happened to the fairies that disappeared and maybe prove his dad is innocent as well.

Henry was a fun hero.  He has a good strong voice throughout the book and a fun personality.  He is a very laid back person, but when it comes time to act he doesn’t hesitate.  He is brave, smart, and lovable.  It is fun to watch his relationships with people grow and develop throughout the story.  He is shy especially around a very cute she wolf, but once you get past the shyness he has a lot of depth to him.  He never knew his mother and his father is in prison so he has never really had any good role models, but he always tries to do what he thinks is right.  He was an easy character to connect with and I really enjoyed reading his story.

This book was full of charm and adventure.  I have always enjoyed fairytales and I loved the different twists in this took.  It collaborated a whole bunch of fairytales into one story and it worked perfectly.   The characters were funny and engaging.  The romance was sweet and well developed.  The story was interesting and had a great mystery.  I was hooked from page one and I had a hard time putting the book down after I started it.  Overall, I really enjoyed this book and I would highly recommend it to anyone that enjoys a good adventure filled with wayward fairytale creatures.

Notable Scene:

“Doc?”

No answer.  The light in his study’s even dimmer than out in the hall.  A cold drip of rain rolls down my neck, icy as it weaves between my hair.

“Doc? It’s Henry.” Nothing. “I think-“ Where is he? “I think we have some stuff to talk about.: It’s so dark in here I can hardly see.

“Doc?”

My eyes adjust now.  I see something, something I can’t explain.  The air in front of me swims like shadows over glass.  There’s something floating in the middle of the room.  Floating-dead center, in the middle of the musty air.  It looks like-

“Dad?”

I blink.  Something’s wrong with me.  My father is floating there, hovering in the air.  I stare at him, hoping the vision will disappear.  Hoping I’ll wake up. /but there he is-the hazy shape of a ghostly wolf. Then I realize: It’s not a vision at all. And it’s not my father. It’s Doc.

My eyes are finally adjusting to the darkness. I can see more now. I can see it all: The rope around his neck. The cord rising into intricate knots strung over the rafters and pulled taut. Doc’s jaw slack, his tongue flopping down like a thinly sliced steak.

He’s dead. And it’s fresh. He’s still swaying.

FTC Advisory: Razorbill/Penguin provided me with a copy of Dust City. No goody bags, sponsorships, “material connections,” or bribes were exchanged for my review.

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Rating: 7.0/10 (4 votes cast)
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Rating: 0 (from 0 votes)
Review: Dust City by Robert Paul Weston, 7.0 out of 10 based on 4 ratings
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